Decelerating Transition to a Rolling Vertical Landing.

The RVL should be used when the landing surface isn’t long enough to support a SL, but the landing area cannot support a VL because it is subject to damage from heating or is a source of FOD. Decelerating transitions for RVL are started from a key position approximately ¾ NM from the touchdown point at an altitude of approximately 310 feet AGL. At the key, the aircraft attitude and estimated nozzle angle are set while a crabbed approach is used to maintain runway centerline. The aircraft is flown on a slightly descending flight path (approx. 3o) until the touchdown point reaches the desired level of depression in the HUD. At this point, flight path can be adjusted to ensure precise landing on centerline and at the desired point. Normally a glideslope of three degrees will satisfy to control touchdown point and rollout distance. However, a steeper glideslope, up to six degrees, may be necessary when approaching over significant obstacles into short fields. If FOD is a concern, a ground speed of 60 knots or higher will be required, otherwise groundspeeds slower than 60 knots can be considered.

Approaching 180

N/A

1. Nozzles

40 – 60o

2. Flaps

Check programming and droop

3. AOA

10 – 12o

Off the 180

N/A

4. Adjust flight path with stick

N/A

5. Control AOA with throttle or nozzles

N/A

At the Key

N/A

6. Set attitude

WITCH HAT ON THE HORIZON

7. Nozzles

AS REQUIRED (adjust to maintain desired groundspeed)

8. Minimize sideslip, ensure no more than 15o AOA.

N/A

9. Adjust power to intercept desired glideslope to touchdown point.

N/A

At touchdown

N/A

10. Throttle

IDLE

11. Nosewheel steering

ENGAGE WHEN ROLLING TRAIGHT AND PEDALS ARE NEUTRALIZED

12. Nozzles

AS SET

13. Brakes

APPLY

14. Trim

MINIMUM 2o ND

15. Water

OFF

16. Nozzles

LESS THAN 60o WHEN SLOW

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